Top tips to protect your kids against cyber bullying

Top tips to protect your kids against cyber bullying

What Can You Do to Protect Your Children from Cyberbullying? Managing our children’s access to technology is one of the biggest challenges parents face today.

We worry that children spend too much time watching screens and don’t play outside enough when they are young. Kids and teens are addicted to their phones completely.

They want their cell phone when they get older, and then they can access the whole world (the good, the bad, and the ugly) in their hands. Cyberbullying has become a serious problem because of the widespread use of the internet, smartphones, and text messaging.

Top tips to protect your kids against cyber bullying
Top tips to protect your kids against cyber bullying

How to Protect Your Kids from Cyberbullying

Parents may take drastic measures to prevent the unthinkable, but blocking kids from social media in the short term does not prepare them for adulthood. Social media can be used as a tool to teach healthy communication and relationship skills, both online and in-person, rather than shielding them from online dangers. You can prevent cyberbullying’s damaging effects by following the suggestions below:

  • As early as possible, establish healthy tech boundaries
  • Allow your child to communicate openly
  • Encourage your child to learn alongside you as early as possible
  • Create an environment that encourages mental health awareness and understanding
  • Keep an eye out for changes in behavior
  • Make sure your child isn’t spending too much time online or with their devices
  • Be calm and compassionate
  • Find the time to talk
  • Ask them what they want
  • Think about the bigger picture

As early as possible, establish healthy tech boundaries

Once children are allowed to use electronics, restrict and permit them to use them appropriately. Developing a healthy sense of self separate from their digital identity. By doing so, children will avoid risky or hurtful online communication as they grow up.

Allow your child to communicate openly

Make sure that your son or daughter comes to you with questions about their relationships at school or online activities. You can discuss their rights and responsibilities if they ask for their phone, computer, or social media account. Creating a “Declaration of Rights and Responsibilities” with your child is possible that outlines what behavior they may accept and display online.

Encourage your child to learn alongside you as early as possible

Family discussions about cyberbullying, privacy and other online risks can be helpful. This is a great opportunity for you and your child to discuss what isn’t okay to do on the Internet during an unsafe situation. Your child may respond differently to certain incidents, and you may want to get feedback about how you can best assist them with any online issues. As your kid ages, keep in mind that both your responses may change.

Create an environment that encourages mental health awareness and understanding

Bullies target children with depression and anxiety, and shame and secrecy only make matters worse for them. If you and your kids are educated about their causes and effects, you can help de-stigmatize these illnesses. In the same way as physical illness, mental illness revolves around physical changes. Make sure your child or a loved one who has mental illness gets the right help and recognizes that their symptoms do not mean that they are bad or flawed.

Keep an eye out for changes in behavior

When your child withdraws from activities or social situations that they previously enjoyed, this can be a sign of cyberbullying. There are rare instances where it is advisable to betray a child’s trust by reading their text messages or other private communications. However, this can cause the child to act more secretive in the future.

Make sure your child isn’t spending too much time online or with their devices

It could be a red flag if you notice your child is increasingly or emotionally preoccupied with their phone or computer or if their online activities increase. Even if you have a prior agreement indicating you will check your child’s online account, it’s usually best to talk to your child beforehand about your concerns. Involve them in determining what must be done next and explain why you feel it was necessary to take action.

Be calm and compassionate

First and foremost, thank your child for sharing concerns about cyberbullying and unsafe online activities with you. You can then agree on how to proceed.

Find the time to talk

Be sure to address any behavioral or emotional changes you observe while you and your child are both able to talk freely in a low-stress environment. Don’t be dramatic or judgmental, and you may find it helpful to practice your words with your child beforehand.

Ask them what they want

Discuss a solution with your child if he or she is experiencing emotional stress as a result of something they have witnessed online.

Think about the bigger picture

Consider organizing school-wide events and initiatives on cyberbullying led by students, and discuss potential activities with school administrators. Students can learn about social media risks and take action to combat them in a proactive, positive way without casting an unwanted spotlight on their children.

 

Conclusion

Most children who are bullied will not tell their parents because they are afraid they will be taken away from the Internet or complain to the bully’s parents. They may also blame themselves or feel ashamed. Help your child to realize that everyone deserves respect. People may hurt others to feel better about themselves or in response to bullying they have experienced. Your child should understand that it is important to you to know how they are doing to help them.

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